Autism Beyond The iPad

Autism Beyond The iPad

The iPad has been transformative for the disability community in general, and those with Autism in particular.  While I recognize everyone believes they have experienced something transformative with touch devices, only those with disabilities have experienced the exponential impact of overcoming human limits.

The transformative impact of the iPad and touch devices on those with disabilities is plateauing, and will soon be fading.  These devices have seen very little innovation since 2012-2013 with the introduction of the Mini and the Air.   They are still excellent devices, but their sales have declined for these reasons.

Technological breakthroughs are coming and one of my favorite categories are wearable devices.   These devices have greater potential for helping those with disabilities overcome human limits, than anything we have seen in the last two decades.

Digital Trends covered one category of wearable called foldable devices.

Foldable displays and smartphones are typically associated with manufacturing giants like Samsung and LG. Add another player to that list: Lenovo. The company just demoed a prototype foldable tablet and phone at its Tech World convention in San Francisco.

Digital Trends

Autism

The first prototype is a narrow-looking phone that McCarthy slapped and wrapped around her wrist — as she says, it was an easy place to keep her phone when she’s wearing a dress without pockets.

Digital Trends

Autism

These type of devices will no longer have to be carried, but can be placed on the body, and in time the clothing.  Others will be able to be folded for increased portability making mobility easier for the user.

Autism

Autism

We are some distance from the types of devices the general population will embrace, but when they reach a point of mass acceptance, the leading early adopter market will be those with disabilities.


Also published on Medium.

About Russ Ewell

Since 1994 I have been devoted to the research and application of innovative technology solutions to education. My passion for these pursuits has been driven by my experience as a parent of children with special needs. During the economic technological growth explosion of the 1990's I was lived and worked in Silicon Valley, and was fortunate enough to find a group of people with similar interests and passions. As a result I was able to launch a non-profit called Hope Technology Group whose mission became advancing the use of technology in education. We eventually launched Hope Technology School, which has used technology to build a fascinating and effective educational program that practices full inclusion. Around the same time, I was fortunate enough to develop and build an awarding winning program called E-Soccer with the help of great friends and excellent coaches. These endeavors have left me with a continuing hunger to learn more about the possibilites of education, technology, and inclusion.

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